HISTORY OF THE HOCHELAGA

BUILT IN 1879

OUR HOTEL

The Hochelaga Inn is one of the most recognizable buildings on Sydenham Street. The French Victorian-style mansion looms over the street and walking by it takes you right back to the year 1879, when it was built for John McIntyre, a Kingston lawyer who also served as mayor of the city in 1878. The home was later sold to the Bank of Montreal and converted into a retreat for executives in 1907, then apartments in 1933 and finally into a bed and breakfast in 1985.

ORIGINAL OWNERS

The mansion was initially built for a single family, but it’s almost unimaginable in the present day that a single family could occupy such a large house. McIntyre even added an addition, known now as the Cottage House, which was built to house extra staff.

FRENCH VICTORIAN CHARM

The mansion has very intricate brick and wood work. With the handmade finishings, contrasting green and white woodwork gives the exterior its French Victorian charm. The front of the mansion boasts a porch and entrance-way decorated with wooden panels while the prominent central tower, hexagonal at its top, rises above the house much in the manner of a steeple of a church.

WHAT'S IN THE NAME

The Inn is named after Hochelaga, a sixteenth century Iroquoian village situated where present day Montreal now lies. A tribute to it's history of being purchased by the Bank of Montreal.